« Mountain musings and a thought for the 4th of July | Main | View from the Trident on South Georgia Island »

July 10, 2007

Comments

Feed You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post.

Phil summers

This is most interesting footage. It reminds me of a few quarries I've been in here in Tassie.
I'm struck by the angle of the terrain on the 'Norton' route (heh heh) and the Longland descent traverse.
The colour of the rock is noticeable too, a tan hue, which is rather surprising.
It won't be easy finding 1924 oxygen cylinders (rusted) in this environment, however there are a few places where they are likely to be and thus worthy of a dedicated area search based on calculated usage rates of individual cylinders as you'll soon see....
Most revealing footage indeed. thank you.

Phil

Jake Norton

Hi Phil,
Thanks for your note, and good to hear from you! Yup - the rock up there definitely hides bottles well - especially '24 bottles! - and also natural fiber clothing. Makes searches tough, but it wouldn't be any fun if it were easy!
Hope all's well in Tassie!
Best,
Jake

phil summers

Many thanks for your insights today Jake vis a vis colour 'blending' of old objects.
I'd imagine snow goggles also being a bother in this regard too as most are tinted and thus drown out colour.

I'm nearing the end of an 'epic' multi part paper I've written on this sort of thing, that looks at oxygen cylinders, numbers taken up by M&I, usage combinations and current locations based on some new calculations I've done (simple stuff). All great fun!.

In light of that the sort of terrain and the sheer area in question of which to search, I'm increasingly of the mind that only specific searches in key locations based on calculated usage and positioning of M&I spent cylinders is the best way to
find more clues.
In short a sound theoretical
basis beforehand leading to dedicated searches in predicted areas where even a negative result tells us something new.
My new work in this area delves deeply into this matter and I've made some interesting new discoveries that may better refine just what M&I did up there in greater detail.
The results have opened up intriguing new prospects for me,which I'll be publishing the at the appropriate juncture.
Let me know if your interested.

Many thanks for your footage up there and interest in my papers.
I'm well indeed and enjoying the welcome rain in Tassie today. Good wet weekend for watching Dr who!.

Hope you're well,

Phil

phil summers

Many thanks for your insights today Jake vis a vis colour 'blending' of old objects.
I'd imagine snow goggles also being a bother in this regard too as most are tinted and thus drown out colour.

I'm nearing the end of an 'epic' multi part paper I've written on this sort of thing, that looks at oxygen cylinders, numbers taken up by M&I, usage combinations and current locations based on some new calculations I've done (simple stuff). All great fun!.

In light of that the sort of terrain and the sheer area in question of which to search, I'm increasingly of the mind that only specific searches in key locations based on calculated usage and positioning of M&I spent cylinders is the best way to
find more clues.
In short a sound theoretical
basis beforehand leading to dedicated searches in predicted areas where even a negative result tells us something new.
My new work in this area delves deeply into this matter and I've made some interesting new discoveries that may better refine just what M&I did up there in greater detail.
The results have opened up intriguing new prospects for me,which I'll be publishing the at the appropriate juncture.
Let me know if your interested.

Many thanks for your footage up there and interest in my papers.
I'm well indeed and enjoying the welcome rain in Tassie today. Good wet weekend for watching Dr who!.

Hope you're well,

Phil

The comments to this entry are closed.

Blog Widget by LinkWithin

Become a Fan

Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported

FB widget

  • NetworkedBlogs